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Correspondence Courses

 Correspondence Courses Class List

SS 001 Intro to Language Skills & Research Methods (0)
Students may take this course as an independent study with the instructor’s prior approval. An introduction to the disciplines that enable a student to learn the languages, interact with texts, and develop and express sound conclusions based on primary and secondary source research. This course also orients new students to the seminary setting.

TH 406 The Christian Framework I
(3)
An examination of the implications of key biblical events with their doctrinal connections from creation to the fall of Israel for philosophy, science, history, language, psychology, politics, education, economics, and social life.

TH 407 The Christian Framework II (3)
A continuation of the examination of the implications of key biblical events from the exile of Israel to the emergence of the church for all of life, including modern eschatologies of the environmental and global society. Prerequisite: TH 406.

NT 201–02 Beginning Greek (4–4)
A study of Greek elementary grammar with the purpose of becoming acquainted with the fundamentals of Greek. Students are exposed to passages from the Greek New Testament from the outset of the course.

BI 301 Hermeneutics and Bible Study Methods (3)
A study of the basic principles of hermeneutics and methods of Bible study. The course is designed to give the new student a solid foundation for Bible study.
 
BI 302–303 Old Testament History and Survey (3–3)
Fall semester is a study of the structure and argument of each book from Genesis to Jeremiah, including a survey of the history of Israel and of the peoples in the ancient Near East whose history influenced the Jewish nation. Spring semester is a study of the structure and argument of each of the Poetical books and the Prophets, as well as of the ancient Near Eastern peoples whose history influenced the Jewish nation.
HT 501 Church History I (2) [Also online]
A study of Christianity from the first century to the eve of the Reformation with emphasis on major theological developments and significant leaders and events.
HT 502 Church History II (2) [Also online]
A study of Christianity from the first century to the eve of the Reformation with emphasis on major theological developments and significant leaders and events.
HT 503 History of Doctrine (2)
A study of the theological and historical development of selected doctrines with attention to the progressive development of each theological theme from the first century to the present day.
BI 304-305 NT History and Survey (3)
BI 304 is a study of the structure, argument, and the historical and cultural settings of the Gospels and Acts, as well as a survey of the intertestamental period. Included in the study are outlines of each book and discussions of current problems. BI 305 repeats this approach for Romans through Revelation.

BI 306 Advanced Hermeneutics (3)
A detailed study of the principles of the consistent literal-grammatical-historical system of biblical interpretation. This course requires the student to think through the basic issues of interpretation of literature in order to grasp the hermeneutical principles and to apply them in the interpretation of selected problem passages.

JS 801 Jewish Life of Christ (2)
A chronological survey of the life of Jesus Christ as recorded in the four Gospels. The course will focus on first-century Jewish culture, theological perspectives, and the rabbinic background in which Jesus lived, died, and rose again.
NT 201 Beginning Greek (4)
A study of Greek elementary grammar with the purpose of becoming acquainted with the fundamentals of Greek. Students are exposed to passages from the Greek New Testament from the outset of the course.

TH 401 Bibliology, Theology Proper, Angelology (3)
A theological study of the Bible, God the Father, and angels.

TH 402 Christology, Pneumatology (3)
A theological study of the second and third Persons of the Triune Godhead.
TH 409 Dispensationalism (2)
The study of the distinguishable administrations in the progressive outworking of God’s divine purpose and an examination of the hermeneutical basis of Dispensationalism.


As additional courses become available, information will be posted on the CTS web site.